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Tropical Ecosystems: Structure, Diversity and Human Welfare. Proceedings of the Intematlonai Conference on Tropical Ecosystems
 

Summary: Tropical Ecosystems: Structure, Diversity and Human Welfare.
Proceedings of the Intematlonai Conference on Tropical Ecosystems
K. N: Ganeshalah, R. Uma Shaanker and K. S. Bawa (ads)
Published by Oxford-ISH, New Deihl. 2001. pp.739-743.
Fungal endophytes in neotropical trees:
Abundance, diversity, and ecological
implications
A. Elizabeth Arnold
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 1041 E. Lowell, BSW 310,
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
e-mail: amold@ccit.arizona.edu
Although fungi comprise only ca. 72,000described species, many authors
rank them among hyperdiversetaxa, comparingfungi with nematodes, mites
and insects in terms of global species richness (Cqlwell and Coddington,
1994;Hawksworth et al., 1995).However, the true scale of fungal diversity is
a matter of open debate, with estimates ranging from hundreds of thousands
of species (Aptroot, 1997)to values as high as 1.5million species (Hawks-
worth, 1991)and greater (e.g.,Cannon, 1997).Recent assessments of fungal
biodiversity in tropical forests, where fungal richness is ~ought to be
greatest,have begun to refine richness est:iri1ates,and in the last decade have

  

Source: Arnold, A. Elizabeth - School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine