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Abstract We measured the gain and phase of horizontal and vertical vergences of five subjects as a function of
 

Summary: Abstract We measured the gain and phase of horizontal
and vertical vergences of five subjects as a function of
stimulus area and position. Vergence eye movements
were recorded by the scleral search coil method as sub-
jects observed dichoptic displays oscillating in antiphase
either from side to side or up and down with a peak-to-
peak magnitude of 0.5 at either 0.1 Hz or 1.0 Hz. The
stimulus was a central textured disc with diameter rang-
ing from 0.75 to 65, or a peripheral annulus with outer
diameter 65 and inner diameter ranging from 5 to 45.
The remaining field was black. For horizontal vergence
at both stimulus frequencies, gain and the phase lag were
about the same for a 0.75 stimulus as for a 65 central
stimulus. For vertical vergence, mean gain increased and
mean phase lag decreased with increasing diameter of
the central stimulus up to approximately 20. Thus, the
stimulus integration area is much smaller for horizontal
vergence than for vertical vergence. The integration area
for vertical vergence is similar to that for cyclovergence,
as revealed in a previous study. For both types of ver-

  

Source: Allison, Robert - Department of Computer Science, York University (Toronto)

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences; Biology and Medicine