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Journal of Experimental Psychology:General Copyright 1991by the AmericanPsychologicalAssociation,Inc. 1991, Vol. 120,No. 2, 150-172 0096-3445/91/$3.00
 

Summary: Journal of Experimental Psychology:General Copyright 1991by the AmericanPsychologicalAssociation,Inc.
1991, Vol. 120,No. 2, 150-172 0096-3445/91/$3.00
Predicting Similarity and Categorization From Identification
F. GregoryAshbyand W. WilliamLee
Univemty of California, Santa Barbara
In this article, the relation between the identification, similarityjudgment, and categorizationof
multidimensional perceptual stimuli is studied. The theoretical analysis focused on general
recognitiontheory (GRT), which is a multidimensional generalizationofsignaldetection theory.
In one application, 2 Ss first identified a set of confusable stimuli and then made judgments of
their pairwisesimilarity.The second application was to Nosofsky's(1985b, 1986)identification-
categorization experiment. In both applications, a GRT model accounted for the identification
data better than Luce's (1963)biased-cboicemodel. The identification resultswere then usedto
predict performance in the similarityjudgment and categorizationconditions. The GRT identi-
fication model accurately predicted the similarity judgments under the assumption that Ks
allocated attention to the 2 stimulus dimensions differently in the 2 tasks. The categorization
data werepredicted successfullywithout appealingto the notion of selectiveattention. Instead, a
simpler GRT model that emphasized the different decision rules used in identification and
categorizationwas adequate.
The perceptual processes involved when subjects identify,
categorize, or judge the pairwise similarity of multidimen-

  

Source: Ashby, F. Gregory - Department of Psychology, University of California at Santa Barbara

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences