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2001 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists SHORTER CONTRIBUTIONS
 

Summary: 2001 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
SHORTER CONTRIBUTIONS
Copeia, 2001(2), pp. 508513
Cytochrome b Phylogeny Does Not Match Subspecific Classification in
the Western Terrestrial Garter Snake, Thamnophis elegans
ANNE M. BRONIKOWSKI AND STEVAN J. ARNOLD
We sequenced a 307-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from
42 individuals representing 14 populations of the western terrestrial garter snake,
Thamnophis elegans. Current taxonomy recognizes either five or six subspecies of T.
elegans based on color and scale morphology, but all agree on three major geograph-
ic races (T. e. elegans, terrestris, and vagrans). Although the cytochrome b phylogeny
did not match subspecific classification of the populations, it did yield geographi-
cally proximate groups. Populations from the Sierra Nevada range and Monterey,
California, formed one monophyletic group of T. e. elegans and T. e. terrestris. This
Sierran/Monterey group was included in a larger group with eastern populations
from the Great Basin (T. e. vagrans). The other well-supported group was comprised
of populations from the western Great Basin (T. e. vagrans). One population from
the northern California coast (T. e. terrestris) was basal to both groups of popula-
tions. Thus, neither T. e. vagrans nor T. e. terrestris formed monophyletic groups.
Average percent sequence divergence between the outgroup (T. sirtalis) and T. ele-

  

Source: Arnold, Stevan J. - Department of Zoology, Oregon State University
Bronikowski, Anne - Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology