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HIERARCHICAL CORRELATES OF BIRD ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE ON NORTHEASTERN U.S.A. LAKES
 

Summary: HIERARCHICAL CORRELATES OF BIRD ASSEMBLAGE
STRUCTURE ON NORTHEASTERN U.S.A. LAKES
ANDREW P. ALLEN1,2 and RAYMOND J. O'CONNOR1
1 Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine, 5755 Nutting Hall, Orono, ME 04469
U.S.A.; 2 Dynamac Corporation, 200 SW 35th Street, Corvallis, OR 97333 U.S.A.
Present address and address for correspondence: Department of Biology, University of New
Mexico, 167 Castetter Hall, Albuquerque, NM 87131 U.S.A., e-mail: drewa@unm.edu
(Received 17 July 1998; accepted 29 January 1999)
Abstract. We investigated the factors structuring lake shore bird assemblages of the northeastern
U.S.A. using data collected from 158 lakes between 1992 and 1994. The assemblage data were
aggregated and standardized to produce assemblage compositions consisting of proportions of indi-
viduals employing different foraging, dietary, and migratory strategies. The assemblage data were
then re-expressed using compositional analysis techniques and subjected to regression tree analysis
to identify environmental correlates over a range of scales. Regionally, human density in the wa-
tershed was the most important predictor for the foraging, dietary, and migratory compositions.
A combination of anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic factors likely contributed to these broad-
scale associations because land use was largely confounded with climate and geomorphology. More
locally, associations with lake shore residential-urban development were identified as being important
for the foraging and dietary compositions, as were associations with lake shore wetlands, but only
contingent there being little human development present locally and regionally. Assemblages were

  

Source: Allen, Andrew P. - National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California at Santa Barbara

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology