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MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, Apr. 2008, p. 27922802 Vol. 28, No. 8 0270-7306/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/MCB.01203-07
 

Summary: MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, Apr. 2008, p. 27922802 Vol. 28, No. 8
0270-7306/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/MCB.01203-07
Copyright 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Spreading of a Corepressor Linked to Action of Long-Range
Repressor Hairy
Carlos A. Martinez and David N. Arnosti*
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Genetics Program, Michigan State University,
East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1319
Received 6 July 2007/Returned for modification 14 August 2007/Accepted 4 February 2008
Transcriptional repressor proteins play key roles in the control of gene expression in development. For the
Drosophila embryo, the following two functional classes of repressors have been described: short-range repres-
sors such as Knirps that locally inhibit the activity of enhancers and long-range repressors such as Hairy that
can dominantly inhibit distal elements. Several long-range repressors interact with Groucho, a conserved
corepressor that is homologous to mammalian TLE proteins. Groucho interacts with histone deacetylases and
histone proteins, suggesting that it may effect repression by means of chromatin modification; however, it is not
known how long-range effects are mediated. Using embryo chromatin immunoprecipitation, we have analyzed
a Hairy-repressible gene in the embryo during activation and repression. When inactivated, repressors,
activators, and coactivators cooccupy the promoter, suggesting that repression is not accomplished by the
displacement of activators or coactivators. Strikingly, the Groucho corepressor is found to be recruited to the
transcribed region of the gene, contacting a region of several kilobases, concomitant with a loss of histone H3

  

Source: Arnosti, David N. - Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine