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Microcontact insertion printing Thomas J. Mullen, Charan Srinivasan, J. Nathan Hohman, Susan D. Gillmor,
 

Summary: Microcontact insertion printing
Thomas J. Mullen, Charan Srinivasan, J. Nathan Hohman, Susan D. Gillmor,
Mitchell J. Shuster, Mark W. Horn, Anne M. Andrews, and Paul S. Weissa
Center for Nanoscale Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
16802-6300
Received 20 October 2006; accepted 26 November 2006; published online 9 February 2007
The authors describe a chemical patterning technique, "microcontact insertion printing," that utilizes
conventional microcontact printing to pattern isolated molecules diluted within a preexisting
self-assembled monolayer. By modifying the preexisting monolayer quality, the stamping duration,
and/or the concentration of the patterned molecule, they can influence the extent of molecular
exchange and precisely control the molecular composition of patterned self-assembled monolayers.
This simple methodology can be used to fabricate complex patterns via multiple stamping steps and
has applications ranging from bioselective surfaces to molecular-scale electronic components.
2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2457525
Chemically patterned films are of great interest and have
been proposed for applications ranging from bioactive sur-
faces to molecular-sized electrical components.14
Tradi-
tional lithographic techniques are limited in resolution, re-
quire specialized facilities, and cannot produce structures

  

Source: Andrews, Anne M. - Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine