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Molecular Ecology (2008) 17, 53365348 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.04000.x 2008 The Authors
 

Summary: Molecular Ecology (2008) 17, 5336­5348 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.04000.x
© 2008 The Authors
Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Global phylogeography and seascape genetics of the lemon
sharks (genus Negaprion)
J. K. SCHULTZ,* K. A. FELDHEIM, S. H. GRUBER, M. V. ASHLEY,§ T. M. MCGOVERN¶ and
B. W. BOWEN*
*Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, PO Box 1346, Kaneohe, HI 96744, USA, Pritzker Laboratory
for Molecular Systematics and Evolution, The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA, Division of Marine
Biology and Fisheries, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149, USA and
Bimini Biological Field Station, 15 Elizabeth Drive, South Bimini, Bahamas and 9300 SW 99 Street Miami, FL 33176, USA,
§Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60608, USA, ¶Ocean
Technology Group, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu, HI 96819, USA
Abstract
Seascapes are complex environments, and populations are often isolated by factors other
than distance. Here we investigate the role of coastal habitat preference and philopatry in
shaping the distribution and population structure of lemon sharks. The genus Negaprion
comprises the amphiatlantic lemon shark (N. brevirostris), with a relict population in the
eastern Pacific, and its Indo-West Pacific sister species, the sicklefin lemon shark (N. acutidens).

  

Source: Ashley, Mary V. - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology