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Regional Wave Propagation in New England and New York by Gisela M. Viegas, Laurie G. Baise, and Rachel E. Abercrombie
 

Summary: Regional Wave Propagation in New England and New York
by Gisela M. Viegas, Laurie G. Baise, and Rachel E. Abercrombie
Abstract We validate and improve 1D velocity models of the two main crustal
provinces in the northeastern United States (NEUS), using seismograms from the
20 April 2002 M 5 Au Sable Forks earthquake, which is the largest earthquake in
the region to be recorded by multiple, recently deployed, good-quality, regional broad-
band stations. To predict and mitigate the effects of future earthquakes in the north-
eastern United States, more information is needed regarding both the local earthquake
sources and how seismic waves travel through the region. We investigate the source
and regional wave propagation for the Au Sable Forks earthquake. The earthquake
epicenter is located near the boundary of two distinct geological provinces, the
Appalachian (New England) and Grenville (New York). We use a forward-modeling
approach to study the waveforms recorded at 16 stations located within 400 km of the
epicenter. We generate synthetic seismograms using the frequency­wavenumber
method, testing several published models for the two provinces. Several models per-
form well at low frequencies (<0:1 Hz). We refine these models and generate two
alternative 1D crustal models for intermediate frequencies (<1 Hz) of engineering
interest. Our new Grenville model performs better than previously published models
for all six source-station paths modeled in that province according to goodness of fit
statistics: variance reduction and correlation coefficient. Our alternative Appalachian

  

Source: Abercrombie, Rachel E. - Department of Earth Sciences, Boston University

 

Collections: Geosciences