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JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / MARCH 2000 / 225 NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM ENGINEERED SOIL SYSTEMS
 

Summary: JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / MARCH 2000 / 225
NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM ENGINEERED SOIL SYSTEMS
By J. Jeffrey Peirce1
and Viney P. Aneja2
ABSTRACT: Sophisticated laboratory equipment and procedures are developed and used in controlled experi-
ments to measure nitric oxide (NO) emissions ranging from 42 to 75 ng N/m2
s from sludge-amended soil of
concern to environmental engineers because nitric oxide emitted to the troposphere is a precursor to troublesome
ozone formation and also of concern to agricultural engineers because valuable nitrogen as fertilizer is lost from
the soil. Water-filled pore space is confirmed to be of critical importance to NO flux, and the upper layers of
soil are determined to contribute the larger portion of the NO fluxing from the soil to the troposphere. More
than 42% of the total NO flux comes from the top 1 cm of soil, with NO contributions decreasing exponentially
with soil depth and very little if any tropospheric NO contributed from soil at a depth of 20 cm or greater. The
results are discussed in terms of microbiological, chemical, and soil transport processes that influence NO flux
from sludge-amended soil.
INTRODUCTION
Nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions from unamended and en-
gineered soils can adversely impact local and regional air qual-
ity in the lower troposphere and can directly impact public
health and vegetation as subsequent ozone (O3) formation; ac-

  

Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences