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ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00640.x
 

Summary: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00640.x
MOLECULAR CLOCKS PROVIDE NEW
INSIGHTS INTO THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY
OF GALEICHTHYINE SEA CATFISHES
Ricardo Betancur-R.1,2
and Jonathan W. Armbruster1
1
Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, 331 Funchess Hall, Auburn, Alabama 36849
2
E-mail: betanri@gmail.com
Received August 28, 2008
Accepted January 7, 2009
Intercontinental distributions in the southern hemisphere can either be the result of Gondwanan vicariance or more recent
transoceanic dispersal. Transoceanic dispersal has come into vogue for explaining many intercontinental distributions; however, it
has been used mainly for organisms that can float or raft between the continents. Despite their name, the Sea Catfishes (Ariidae)
have limited dispersal ability, and there are no examples of nearshore ariid genera with a transoceanic distribution except for
Galeichthys where three species occur in southern Africa and one in the Peruvian coast. A previous study suggested that the group
originated in Gondwana, and that the species arrived at their current range after the breakup of the supercontinent in the Early
Cretaceous. To test this hypothesis, we infer molecular phylogenies (mitochondrial cytochrome b, ATP synthase 8/6, 12S, and 16S;

  

Source: Armbruster, Jonathan W. - Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology