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How We Say No: Norepinephrine, Inferior Frontal Gyrus, and Response Inhibition
 

Summary: COMMENTARY
How We Say No: Norepinephrine, Inferior Frontal
Gyrus, and Response Inhibition
Gary Aston-Jones and Joshua I. Gold
Response Inhibition and Atomoxetine
R
esponse inhibition is a central element of executive con-
trol that is critical for adaptive behavior in a dynamic and
unpredictable environment. The inability to inhibit inap-
propriate responses has been linked to several prevalent disorders,
including compulsions, autism, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD). Therefore, the ability to develop more effective
treatments for these disorders is likely to depend, at least in part,
on understanding the brain mechanisms that control response
inhibition, including the underlying neurotransmitter systems.
Stimulants have long been the treatment of choice for ADHD,
suggesting that the underlying neural dysfunctions involve
monoamine neurotransmitter systems. Genetic analyses in the
last several years have given more support to this idea, indicating
not only that ADHD is highly heritable but also that it is

  

Source: Aston-Jones, Gary - Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine