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1 Introduction The motion of an object's image across the retina cannot directly specify the object's
 

Summary: 1 Introduction
The motion of an object's image across the retina cannot directly specify the object's
motion with respect to the head. Movements of the eye or head also affect the motion of
the object's retinal image; for example, turning the eye to the right adds a component
of leftward motion to the entire visual field. These effects of eye and head movements
must be compensated for if we are to perceive accurately the motions of objects relative
to the head or body. The same problem occurs in the context of perceiving self-motion
from the pattern of motion in the retinal image; changes in this pattern of retinal-
image motion caused by eye or head movements must be compensated for in order to
support accurate perception of self-motion. We use the term pursuit compensation to
refer to the perceptual canceling out or removal of any motion in the retinal image
caused by a smooth eye or head movement, allowing us to perceive accurately relative
motion between ourselves and the objects and scenes around us. In this paper, we
address the specific problem of compensating for the effects of smooth-pursuit eye
movements in visual self-motion perception. However, our results are also qualitatively
Pursuit compensation during self-motion
Perception, 2001, volume 30, pages 1465 ^ 1488
James A Crowell
Department of Psychology, Townshend Hall, Ohio State University, 1885 Neil Avenue, Columbus,
OH 43210, USA; e-mail: crowell@mad.scientist.com

  

Source: Andersen, Richard - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine