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BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 81(1): 139152, 2007 139Bulletin of Marine Science
 

Summary: BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 81(1): 139152, 2007
139Bulletin of Marine Science
2007 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
of the University of Miami
CORAL REEF PAPER
HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS AND AGGREGATION OF
RECRUIT FISHES ON HAWAIIAN CORAL REEFS
Edward E. DeMartini and Todd W. Anderson
ABSTRACT
Associations with structural habitat complexity and the aggregation of individu-
als lessen the risk of predation, and both are commonly observed for recently settled
fishes on coral reefs. On reefs fringing Hawaii Island, such recruits of many fishes,
particularly two species of surgeonfishes, exhibited strong affinities for branching
finger coral (Porites compressa Dana, 1846), the most structurally complex coral
available in the relatively low-diversity assemblage of Hawaiian reef corals. Recruits
of these species also aggregated with conspecific and heterospecific recruits as they
associated with this coral. That recruits of reef fishes take refuge in the best available
shelter, however, is not a novel observation. More noteworthy is the frequent co-oc-
currence of recruits with other recruits of the same and other species. Our observa-
tions suggest that small juvenile reef fishes aggregate near preferred coral habitat

  

Source: Anderson, Todd - Department of Biology, San Diego State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology