Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Publ. Astron. Soc. Aust., 2001, 18, 158165 Science Goals for Antarctic Infrared Telescopes
 

Summary: Publ. Astron. Soc. Aust., 2001, 18, 158165
Science Goals for Antarctic Infrared Telescopes
Michael G. Burton, John W. V. Storey, & Michael C. B. Ashley
Joint Australian Centre for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica,
School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052
M.Burton@unsw.edu.au
Received 2000 November 9, accepted 2001 April 24
Abstract: Over the past few years, site-testing at the South Pole has revealed conditions that are uniquely
favourable for infrared astronomy. In particular, the exceptionally low sky brightness throughout the near-
and mid-infrared leads to the possibility of a modest-sized telescope achieving comparable sensitivity to
that of existing 810 metre class telescopes. An 8 metre Antarctic telescope, if constructed, would yield
performance that would be unrivalled until the advent of the NGST. In this paper we review the scientific
potential of infrared telescopes in Antarctica, and discuss their complementarity with existing 810 metre
class telescopes and future proposed space telescopes. In particular, we discuss the role that a 2 metre class
infrared telescope plays in future plans for the development of an observatory on the Antarctic plateau.
Keywords: Antarctica -- site testing -- telescopes -- instrumentation: miscellaneous -- infrared: general
-- stars: formation -- galaxies: formation -- planetary systems
1 Introduction
The Antarctic plateau provides unique conditions on the
Earth for the conduct of observational astronomy. The air

  

Source: Ashley, Michael C. B. - School of Physics, University of New South Wales

 

Collections: Physics