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Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience www.frontiersin.org August 2009 | Volume 3 | Article 21 | 1 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
 

Summary: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience www.frontiersin.org August 2009 | Volume 3 | Article 21 | 1
BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
published: 27 August 2009
doi: 10.3389/neuro.08.021.2009
these regions reflect the motivational salience of cued stimuli (i.e.,
imperative for action) or the affective properties of the anticipated
reward (i.e., valence)? And, is anticipatory activation modulated
by decreases in motivational salience if magnitude and valence
are held constant? To address these questions we examined brain
activation during anticipation of rewards that varied in valence
and in personal relevance. Decreased personal relevance should
reduce but not eliminate motivational salience, while leaving
magnitude and valence unchanged.
HOW DOES VTA CONTRIBUTE TO REWARD ANTICIPATION
AND LEARNING?
The neural mechanisms that underlie motivation depend on activ-
ity of neurons in the NAcc (Wise, 1980, 2004; Kalivas et al., 2005;
Berridge,2007;Salamone et al.,2007),which are themselves modu-
late by dopaminergic producing neurons in the VTA (Swanson,

  

Source: Adcock, R. Alison - Center for Cognitive Neuroscience & Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine