Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Acta metall. Vol. 36, No. 8, pp. 2335-234% 1988 0001-6160,88 $3.00+0.00 Printed in Great Britain Pergamon Press plc
 

Summary: Acta metall. Vol. 36, No. 8, pp. 2335-234% 1988 0001-6160,88 $3.00+0.00
Printed in Great Britain Pergamon Press plc
CONTINUOUS GROWTH MODEL FOR INTERFACE
MOTION DURING ALLOY SOLIDIFICATION
MICHAEL J. AZIZ I and THEODORE KAPLAN 2
~Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A. and
2Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A.
(Received 27 July 1987)
Abstract--A model is developed that predicts the steady state velocity of a planar interface and the
chemical composition of the growing phase in terms of the interface temperature and the composition
of the parent phase at the interface. The model is applied to solidification of a two-component melt. Solute
partitioning is treated by a previously developed continuous growth model for solute trapping. The
interface velocity is found by generalizing the driving force in a velocity-vs-driving force function used
for solidification of one-component melts. Two different ways of generalizing the driving force are used,
with and without the inclusion of a "solute drag" term. Predictions are made both with and without solute
drag for an ideal solution and for Ag-Cu, a simple eutectic system in which the terminal phases have the
same crystal structure. In both cases, a transition from diffusion-controlled to diffusionless solidification
and a falling interface temperature occur as the interface velocity increases. In the model without solute
drag, significantly less interfacial undercooling is predicted than in the model with solute drag. The
relationship to previous theoretical work, especially to the continuum treatments of Baker and Cahn, and

  

Source: Aziz, Michael J.- School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

 

Collections: Physics; Materials Science