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Copyright 2006 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. Adger, W. N., K. Brown, and E. L. Tompkins. 2005. The political economy of cross-scale networks in
 

Summary: Copyright 2006 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance.
Adger, W. N., K. Brown, and E. L. Tompkins. 2005. The political economy of cross-scale networks in
resource co-management. Ecology and Society 10(2): 9. [online] URL:
http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol10/iss2/art9/
Insight, part of a Special Feature on Scale and Cross-scale Dynamics
The Political Economy of Cross-Scale Networks in Resource Co-
Management
W. Neil Adger1
, Katrina Brown2
, and Emma L. Tompkins2
ABSTRACT. We investigate linkages between stakeholders in resource management that occur at different
spatial and institutional levels and identify the winners and losers in such interactions. So-called cross-
scale interactions emerge because of the benefits to individual stakeholder groups in undertaking them or
the high costs of not undertaking them. Hence there are uneven gains from cross-scale interactions that are
themselves an integral part of social-ecological system governance. The political economy framework
outlined here suggests that the determinants of the emergence of cross-scale interactions are the exercise
of relative power between stakeholders and their costs of accessing and creating linkages. Cross-scale
interactions by powerful stakeholders have the potential to undermine trust in resource management
arrangements. If government regulators, for example, mobilize information and resources from cross-level
interactions to reinforce their authority, this often disempowers other stakeholders such as resource users.

  

Source: Adger, Neil - School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology