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REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE
 

Summary: REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS:
A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE
Ahmet H. Aydilek, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park,
Maryland, USA
Tuncer B. Edil, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, Wisconsin, USA
ABSTRACT
Remediation of contaminated high water content geomaterials, such as wastewater treatment sludges, harbor dredgings,
waste pickle liquor sludges, fly ash slurries, has always been a challenge to the geotechnical community. Among
various remediation alternatives, capping and dewatering is becoming increasingly popular. Geotextiles commonly used
in these projects are expected to prevent erosion of soils in contact with the filter without impeding the flow of seeping
water through the soil. Several empirical criteria incorporating varying factors of safety have been proposed for selection
of geotextile filters; however, they are not directly applicable to high water content geomaterials. An extensive literature
review was made to gather information pertinent to filtration of these geomaterials using geotextiles. Factors affecting
the behavior of filtration processes were presented. Applicability of a recently developed analytical model to predict the
observed filtration behavior was investigated.
1. INTRODUCTION
The retirement of large industrial waste storage facilities in accordance with environmental regulations has become a
critical cost issue for industry and a challenge to the geotechnical community. Many facilities were constructed prior to
the emergence of modern environmental regulations and contain a variety of contaminated high water content materials.

  

Source: Aydilek, Ahmet - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Collections: Engineering