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Sleep Selectively Enhances Hippocampus-Dependent Memory in Mice Denise J. Cai, Tristan Shuman, Michael R. Gorman, Jennifer R. Sage, and Stephan G. Anagnostaras
 

Summary: Sleep Selectively Enhances Hippocampus-Dependent Memory in Mice
Denise J. Cai, Tristan Shuman, Michael R. Gorman, Jennifer R. Sage, and Stephan G. Anagnostaras
University of California, San Diego
Sleep has been implicated as playing a critical role in memory consolidation. Emerging evidence suggests
that reactivation of memories during sleep may facilitate the transfer of declarative memories from the
hippocampus to the neocortex. Previous rodent studies have utilized sleep-deprivation to examine the role
of sleep in memory consolidation. The present study uses a novel, naturalistic paradigm to study the
effect of a sleep phase on rodent Pavlovian fear conditioning, a task with both hippocampus-dependent
and -independent components (contextual vs. cued memories). Mice were trained 1 hour before their
sleep/rest phase or awake/active phase and then tested for contextual and cued fear 12 or 24 hr later. The
authors found that hippocampus-dependent contextual memory was enhanced if tested after a sleep phase
within 24 hr of training. This enhancement was specific to context, not cued, memory. These findings
provide direct evidence of a role for sleep in enhancing hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation
in rodents and detail a novel paradigm for examining sleep-induced memory effects.
Keywords: context, fear conditioning, Pavlovian, circadian, medial temporal lobe
A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep enhances con-
solidation of human memory. Several studies have found that sleep
facilitates retention of declarative memory (Ellenbogen, Hulbert,
Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006; Ellenbogen, Payne,
& Stickgold, 2006; Plihal & Born, 1999), and recently formed

  

Source: Anagnostaras, Stephan - Neurosciences Program & Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine