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Simple technique yields complex structures Self-assembling materials could aid next-generation electronics
 

Summary: Simple technique yields complex structures
Self-assembling materials could aid next-generation electronics

News from PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
Office of Communications
22 Chambers St. Princeton, New Jersey 08542
Telephone 609-258-3601; Fax 609-258-1301
For immediate release: June 10, 2003
Contact: Steven Schultz, (609) 258-5729,
sschultz@princeton.edu
PRINCETON, N.J. -- In a discovery with potential uses from electronics to
biology, Princeton engineers have invented a simple procedure for making
microscopically small particles assemble themselves into complex materials.
The technique allows scientists to force mixtures of tiny beads to crystallize
into tailored structures that could be ideal for channeling laser light through next-generation
telecommunications devices or for mechanically sorting DNA molecules as part of cheaper, faster
biological tests.
In a paper published recently in Physical Review Letters, chemical engineering graduate student
William Ristenpart and Professors Dudley Saville and Ilhan Aksay showed how they could start with
a liquid suspension of jumbled silica and polymer particles and subject them to high frequency

  

Source: Aksay, Ilhan A. - Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University

 

Collections: Materials Science