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Annu. Rev. Physiol. 2002. 64:15387 DOI: 10.1146/annurev.physiol.64.082701.102229
 

Summary: Annu. Rev. Physiol. 2002. 64:15387
DOI: 10.1146/annurev.physiol.64.082701.102229
Copyright c 2002 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
G PROTEINS AND PHOTOTRANSDUCTION
Vadim Y. Arshavsky1, Trevor D. Lamb2, and
Edward N. Pugh, Jr.3
1
Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston,
Massachusetts 02114; e-mail: vadim arshavsky@meei.harvard.edu
2
Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EG UK;
e-mail: TDL1@cam.ac.uk
3
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania 19104; e-mail: pugh@mail.med.upenn.edu
Key Words transducin, phosphodiesterase, amplification, signal termination
s Abstract Phototransduction is the process by which a photon of light captured
by a molecule of visual pigment generates an electrical response in a photoreceptor
cell. Vertebrate rod phototransduction is one of the best-studied G protein signaling
pathways. In this pathway the photoreceptor-specific G protein, transducin, mediates

  

Source: Arshavsky, Vadim Y. - Department of Pharmacology, Duke University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine