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American Journal of Botany 96(5): 897903. 2009. Mutualisms play a critical role in affecting population dy-
 

Summary: 897
American Journal of Botany 96(5): 897903. 2009.
Mutualisms play a critical role in affecting population dy-
namics and structuring communities (Bronstein, 1994). How-
ever, the ability to promote beneficial mutualist interactions
may depend on community context. For many plants, attracting
pollinators is partially dependent on the herbivore community.
Studies in numerous systems have shown that leaf damage trig-
gers the transcriptional activation of genes, which results in the
induction of defense compounds, the emission of wound vola-
tiles, the repair of damaged tissue, and the reassessment of in-
ternal nutritional needs (Leon et al., 2001). Consequently, leaf
damage can affect plant reproduction not only via direct effects
on the quality and number of pollen grains and seeds (Marquis,
1984; Quesada et al., 1995; Mutikainen and Delph, 1996;
Strauss et al., 1996; Lehtila and Strauss, 1999; Avila-Sakar et
al., 2003), but also by reducing a plant's ability to attract polli-
nators, with subsequent reduction in female and sometimes
male reproduction (reviewed in Strauss and Whittall, 2006;
Adler, 2007). Leaf herbivory reduces the visual display or re-

  

Source: Adler, Lynn - Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology