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Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes from three major plant lineages
 

Summary: Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure
of boreal and arctic endophytes from three major plant lineages
K. Lindsay Higgins 1
, A. Elizabeth Arnold *, Jolanta Miadlikowska,
Snehal D. Sarvate 2
, Francžois Lutzoni
Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
Received 18 August 2005; revised 3 July 2006; accepted 19 July 2006
Available online 26 July 2006
Abstract
Although associated with all plants, fungal endophytes (microfungi that live within healthy plant tissues) represent an unknown pro-
portion of fungal diversity. While there is a growing appreciation of their ecological importance and human uses, little is known about
their host specificity, geographic structure, or phylogenetic relationships. We surveyed endophytic Ascomycota from healthy photosyn-
thetic tissues of three plant species (Huperzia selago, Picea mariana, and Dryas integrifolia, representing lycophytes, conifers, and angio-
sperms, respectively) in northern and southern boreal forest (QueŽbec, Canada) and arctic tundra (Nunavut, Canada). Endophytes were
recovered from all plant species surveyed, and were present in <1­41% of 2 mm2
tissue segments examined per host species. Sequence
data from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) were obtained for 280 of 558 isolates. Species-accumulation
curves based on ITS genotypes remained non-asymptotic, and bootstrap analyses indicated that a large number of genotypes remain
to be found. The majority of genotypes were recovered from only a single host species, and only 6% of genotypes were shared between

  

Source: Arnold, A. Elizabeth - School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine