Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
THE ARMAGH-DUNSINK-HARVARD TELESCOPE: FROM DREAM TO OBLIVION C. J. BUTLER
 

Summary: 10
THE ARMAGH-DUNSINK-HARVARD TELESCOPE: FROM DREAM TO OBLIVION
C. J. BUTLER
Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG, N. Ireland
E-mail: cjb@arm.ac.uk
Abstract: The Armagh-Dunsink-Harvard (ADH) Telescope was an instrument with a checkered history that, unlike
many telescopes that have a productive life of many decades, has now all but faded from memory. Nevertheless, its
story is worth telling, if for no other reason, because of the part it played in Irish and international astronomy in the
crucial years following the Second World War.
Keywords: Baker-Schmidt Telescope, Armagh, Dunsink, Harvard, Boyden Observatories
1. INTRODUCTION
Astronomers in Ireland in the 19th century had facilities second to none and they made important contributions to the
emerging disciplines of cosmology, solar physics and stellar photometry. However, as the land tenure system in Ireland
was revolutionised around the turn of the century with tenant farmers now freeholders, the landed gentry, deprived of
their rental income, could no longer afford to support private observatories. Even public observatories, such as Armagh,
founded in 1790 by the Church of Ireland Archbishop, Richard Robinson, and Dunsink, founded in 1783 by Trinity
College, Dublin, were to some extent funded by land entitlements and could no longer afford to employ staff or buy the
new equipment so essential for their daily work (Butler, 1990; Bennett, 1990). By the beginning of the Second World
War, Dunsink and all the richly furnished private observatories were closed and there was only one professional
astronomer on the whole island, namely Dr Eric Lindsay at Armagh. One of his recognised achievements was his part in

  

Source: Armagh Observatory

 

Collections: Physics