Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Journal of ShellfishResear~li,Vol. 24, No. 3, 761-765, 2005. A PROLONGED THERMAL STRESS EXPERIMENT ON THE AMERICAN LOBSTER,
 

Summary: Journal of ShellfishResear~li,Vol. 24, No. 3, 761-765, 2005.
A PROLONGED THERMAL STRESS EXPERIMENT ON THE AMERICAN LOBSTER,
HOMARUS AMERICANUS
ALISTAIR D. M. DOVE,'* BASSEM ALL AM,^ JASON J. POWERS~AND
MARK S. SOKOLOWSKI~
' ~ e ~ a r t m e n tof Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, c/o
Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University. Stony Brook, Necv York 11794; ' ~ a r i n e
Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794
ABSTRACT Two groups of lobsters were maintained for 31 days at temperatures environmentally realistic for Long Island Sound
to investigate the effectsof prolonged thermal stress on the physiology of lobsters. One group was held at 16C.representativeof late
spring(controls),and the other groupat 23C. representativeof late summer/earlyfall (treatments).In viva hemolymph pH and samples
for serum chemistry analysis were taken before and after temperature exposure. Hemolymph samples were taken before, during and
after temperature exposure to investigate effects on hemocyte phagocytic activity assay and total hemocyte counts. Treatment lobsters
developed a significant pH acidosis. Other serum index changes included marked hyperchlore~niaand hyperproteinemia. Phagocytic
activity of hemocytes was significantly depressed (-60%) in treatment lobsters after 14 days and remained so until the end of the
experiment. Similarly. total hemocyte counts increased strongly in the thermal stress group after 14 days, and remained so until the
end of the experiment. Results suggest that late summer temperatures in the bottom waters of Long Island Sound may have profound
deleterious effects on the physiology of lobsters. Recent changes in water temperature regimes in the bottom waters of Long Island
Sound suggest that it may in the long term become inhospitable for lobster survival.
KEY WORDS: lobster. Hornorlrs atnericanus, thermal, temperature, climate, stress. disease, serum chemistry. immunocompetence

  

Source: Allam, Bassem - School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, SUNY at Stony Brook

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology