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Screenshot from id Software's Quake III: Arena showing the typical player and spectator experience in architectural environment-based games. The view is limited to a single room of a particular level (here, the Temple of Retribution), so
 

Summary: Screenshot from id Software's Quake III: Arena showing the typical player and spectator experience in architectural
environment-based games. The view is limited to a single room of a particular level (here, the Temple of Retribution), so
understanding the overall environment and its uses is equally limited. Players and spectators alike find it difficult to know
how the various players are moving though the level, where the weapons and power-ups are located, how the floors are laid
out and linked, the quickest paths from place to place, the good places to hide, and the places to avoid.
COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM August 2004/Vol. 47, No. 8 55
Recent advances in consumer graphics technology make it
possible to interactively explore extremely complex 3D
environments. Architects routinely build detailed 3D
computer-aided design (CAD) models of buildings to visualize
both their internal spaces and their external structures. The trend
toward greater complexity is evident in video games involving
increasingly detailed interactive 3D worlds. These environments
are comprised of many rooms, passageways, characters, and play-
ers, but also tend to be densely occluded.
Few applications are able to simultaneously display their interior
spaces and the external structures. Two related interfaces are ArcBall
[10], which allows rotation, scaling, and zooming of the environ-
ment, and walkthroughs, which allow viewers to move through
rooms within the environment. ArcBall interfaces are often used in

  

Source: Agrawala, Maneesh - Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences