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In many respects, blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica) is enigmatic, and it is certainly unique among eastern US
 

Summary:  Articles
In many respects, blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica) is
enigmatic, and it is certainly unique among eastern US
hardwood species.It has a large range and can grow on almost
any type of site in the eastern forests (Burns and Honkala 1990,
Iverson et al.1999).Despite its ecological breadth,blackgum
almost never obtains overstory dominance, typically repre-
senting just 1% or 2% of the canopy trees. It is the longest-
lived hardwood species in the eastern United States, and
probably ranks among the longest-lived hardwoods any-
where in the world: The oldest known blackgum tree is 679
years old (Sperduto et al.2000),and blackgum ages of 450 to
550 years are not unusual.Blackgum often grows in swamps
and floodplains,but it also occupies extremely droughty sites
(Barnes 1991).It grows best on nutrient-rich sites,but obtains
greater importance on nutrient-poor,xeric,and hydric sites.
Blackgum is one of the few tree species that combine shade
tolerance, drought tolerance, and fire resistance (Harmon
1984, Burns and Honkala 1990). Moreover, it is late succes-
sional but can invade disturbed areas such as old fields,

  

Source: Abrams, Marc David - School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology