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In the fish species studied so far, blood flow to the gastrointestinal tract in resting conditions (qGI) accounts for
 

Summary: In the fish species studied so far, blood flow to the
gastrointestinal tract in resting conditions (qGI) accounts for
20­30% of total cardiac output (Axelsson et al., 1989, 2000;
Axelsson and Fritsche, 1991; Fritsche et al., 1993; Thorarensen
et al., 1993; Thorarensen, 1994; Farrell et al., 2001). Like other
vertebrates, fish cannot perfuse all the circulatory beds at the
same time and have to prioritise the various vascular beds
according to the capacity of the heart. When facing challenging
conditions such as hypoxia or exercise, qGI decreases and there
is a general redistribution of blood flow to other organs
(Axelsson and Fritsche, 1991; Fritsche et al., 1993;
Thorarensen, 1994). It is also well documented that qGI
increases post-feeding in order to facilitate absorption of food
and shorten digestion time.
In their normal habitat, fish have to adjust continuously to
multiple stimuli such as changes in water temperature, salinity
and oxygen levels; they also have to escape predators or forage
and catch prey. If the cardiovascular system cannot fully adjust
to these stimuli, compromises have to be made. This will
become even more pronounced after feeding when a higher

  

Source: Altimiras, Jordi - Department of Biology, Linköpings Universitet

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology