Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Neuronal representations of stimulus associations develop in the temporal lobe during learning
 

Summary: Neuronal representations of stimulus associations
develop in the temporal lobe during learning
Adam Messinger*§
, Larry R. Squire¶
, Stuart M. Zola¶
, and Thomas D. Albright*,
**
*Systems Neurobiology Laboratories, **Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Sloan Center for Theoretical Neurobiology, The Salk Institute,
La Jolla, CA 92037; ¶Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA 92161; and University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093
Contributed by Larry R. Squire, August 15, 2001
Visual stimuli that are frequently seen together become associated
in long-term memory, such that the sight of one stimulus readily
brings to mind the thought or image of the other. It has been
hypothesized that acquisition of such long-term associative mem-
ories proceeds via the strengthening of connections between
neurons representing the associated stimuli, such that a neuron
initially responding only to one stimulus of an associated pair
eventually comes to respond to both. Consistent with this hypoth-
esis, studies have demonstrated that individual neurons in the
primate inferior temporal cortex tend to exhibit similar responses

  

Source: Albright, Tom - Vision Center Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Squire, Larry R. - Memory Research Laboratory, University of California at San Diego

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine