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Journal of Tropical Ecology (2007) 23:253255. Copyright 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0266467406003865 Printed in the United Kingdom
 

Summary: Journal of Tropical Ecology (2007) 23:253­255. Copyright © 2007 Cambridge University Press
doi:10.1017/S0266467406003865 Printed in the United Kingdom
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Feeding encounters between a group of howler monkeys and white-nosed
coatis in a small forest fragment in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico
Norberto Asensio
1
, V´ictor Arroyo-Rodr´iguez and Jurgi Crist´obal-Azkarate
Research Centre in Evolutionary Anthropology and Palaeoecology, School of Biological and Earth Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, James Parsons
Building, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF,UK
Divisi´on de Posgrado. Instituto de Ecolog´ia A. C., Xalapa, M´exico
Centre Especial de Recerca en Primates. Barcelona. Spain
(Accepted 8 November 2006)
Key Words: Alouatta palliata mexicana, feeding, Ficus, fragment, Nasua narica
Interactions between sympatric species are of particular
interest for understanding the mechanisms that allow
animal coexistence in the ecological community. The
mantled howler monkey (Alouatta palliata Gray) and the
white-nosed coati (Nasua narica Linnaeus) are similar-
sized mammals with a sympatric distribution in the

  

Source: Arroyo Rodríguez, Víctor - Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology