Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Mammalian Faunal Succession in the Cretaceous of the Kyzylkum Desert J. David Archibald, Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego,
 

Summary: Mammalian Faunal Succession in the Cretaceous of the Kyzylkum Desert
J. David Archibald, Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego,
California 92181-4614, U.S.A. & Alexander P. Averianov, Zoological Institute, Russian
Academy of Sciences, Universitetskaya nab. 1, Saint Petersburg 199034, Russia
Both metatherians and eutherians are known from the Early Cretaceous (Barremian, 125
mya) of China, while eutherian-dominated mammalian faunas appeared in Asia at least
by the earliest Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian, 95 mya). The approximately 99-93 my old
(Cenomanian) Sheikhdzheili l. f. from western Uzbekistan is a small sample of only
eutherians, including three zhelestids and a possible zalambdalestoid. The much better
known 90 my old (Turonian) Bissekty l. f. at Dzharakuduk in the central Uzbekistan
includes 15 named and unnamed species, based on ongoing analyses. Of these, 12 are
eutherians represented by at least the three groups asioryctitheres, zalambdalestids, and
zhelestids plus an eutherian of uncertain position Paranyctoides. Zalambdalestids
and zhelestids have been argued to be related to the origin of the placental gliriforms
(Euarchontoglires) and ferungulates (Laurasiatheria), respectively, although recent
analyses cast doubt on the first relationship. Although there are four previously
recognized metatherians, we believe three are referable to the deltatheroid Sulestes
karakshi and the fourth, Sailestes quadrans, may belong to Paranyctoides. There is one
multituberculate and one symmetrodont in the Bissekty l. f. While comparably aged
(Turonian) localities in North America have somewhat similar non-therians, they have

  

Source: Archibald, J. David - Department of Biology, San Diego State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Geosciences