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Doping-dependent nonlinear Meissner effect and spontaneous currents in high-Tc superconductors Sheng-Chiang Lee, Mathew Sullivan, Gregory R. Ruchti,* and Steven M. Anlage
 

Summary: Doping-dependent nonlinear Meissner effect and spontaneous currents in high-Tc superconductors
Sheng-Chiang Lee, Mathew Sullivan, Gregory R. Ruchti,* and Steven M. Anlage
Center for Superconductivity Research, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA
Benjamin S. Palmer
Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740, USA
B. Maiorov
and E. Osquiguil
Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, 8400 S. C. de Bariloche,
Río Negro, Argentina
Received 20 May 2004; revised manuscript received 7 September 2004; published 11 January 2005
We measure the local harmonic generation from superconducting thin films at microwave frequencies to
investigate the intrinsic nonlinear Meissner effect near Tc in the zero magnetic field. Both second and third
harmonic generation are measured to identify time-reversal symmetry breaking TRSB and time-reversal
symmetric TRS nonlinearities. We perform a systematic doping-dependent study of the nonlinear response
and find that the TRS characteristic nonlinearity current density scale follows the doping dependence of the
depairing critical current density. We also extract a spontaneous TRSB characteristic current density scale that
onsets at Tc, grows with decreasing temperature, and systematically decreases in magnitude at fixed T/Tc
with underdoping. The origin of this current scale could be Josephson circulating currents or the spontaneous
magnetization associated with a TRSB order parameter.
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.71.014507 PACS number s : 74.25.Nf, 74.25.Dw, 74.25.Sv, 74.78.Bz

  

Source: Anlage, Steven - Center for Superconductivity Research & Department of Physics, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Collections: Materials Science