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The Role of Embodied Intention in Early Lexical Acquisition
 

Summary: The Role of Embodied Intention
in Early Lexical Acquisition
Chen Yua
, Dana H. Ballardb
, Richard N. Aslinc
aDepartment of Psychology and Cognitive Science Program, Indiana University
bDepartment of Computer Science, University of Rochester
cDepartment of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
Received 9 July 2003; received in revised form 18 October 2004; accepted 18 January 2005
Abstract
We examine the influence of inferring interlocutors' referential intentions from their body move-
ments at the early stage of lexical acquisition. By testing human participants and comparing their perfor-
mances in different learning conditions, we find that those embodied intentions facilitate both word dis-
covery and word-meaning association. In light of empirical findings, the main part of this article
presents a computational model that can identify the sound patterns of individual words from continuous
speech, using nonlinguistic contextual information, and employ body movements as deictic references
to discover word-meaning associations. To our knowledge, this work is the first model of word learning
that not only learns lexical items from raw multisensory signals to closely resemble infant language de-
velopment from natural environments, but also explores the computational role of social cognitive skills
in lexical acquisition.

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
Yu, Chen - Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences