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Architecture of the Middle Devonian Kvamshesten Group, western Norway: sedimentary response to deformation above a ramp-flat
 

Summary: Architecture of the Middle Devonian Kvamshesten Group, western
Norway: sedimentary response to deformation above a ramp-flat
extensional fault
P. T. OSMUNDSEN 1'2, B. BAKKE 1, A. K. SVENDBY 1 & T. B. ANDERSEN 1
1Department of Geology, University of Oslo, Pb 1047 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway
2present address." Geological Survey of Norway, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
Abstract: The Mid-Devonian Kvamshesten basin in western Norway formed during late- to
post-Caledonian extensional and strike-slip tectonics. The basin is entirely continental in
origin, and was probably a closed basin through most of its history. It was filled by alluvial-
fluvial deposits belonging to two main terminal fan systems, one sourced in the hanging wall,
one sourced in the footwall of the basin-controlling fault(s). Footwall-directed migration of
the hanging-wall-sourcedfluvial system probably took place during phases of relatively rapid,
fault-controlled subsidence. This gave rise to retrogradational stacking of marginal conglo-
merates and to the footwall-directed migration of the main depocentre(s). During periods of
increased sediment influx from footwall catchments and/or decreased subsidence rates,
coarse, footwall-sourced material prograded far into the basin. The intercalation of material
derived from footwall- and hanging-wall source areas, respectively, gave rise to a pro-
nounced, kilometre-scale rhythmicity that is inferred to reflect fault-block rotation and
footwall erosion. The basin fill also displays a pronounced rhythmic organization on the
80-150 m scale. The Kvamshesten basin was deformed during deposition as a result of its

  

Source: Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge - Centre for Physics of Geological Processes & Department of Geosciences, Universitetet i Oslo

 

Collections: Geosciences