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Molecular Ecology (2000) 9, 14151419 2000 Blackwell Science Ltd
 

Summary: Molecular Ecology (2000) 9, 1415­1419
© 2000 Blackwell Science Ltd
Blackwell Science, Ltd
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Extra-pair paternity in waved albatrosses
KATHRYN P. HUYVAERT,* DAVID J. ANDERSON,* THOMAS C. JONES, WENRUI DUAN
and PATRICIA G. PARKER§
*Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109, USA, Department of Evolution, Ecology and
Organismal Biology, Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210, USA, Department of Molecular Genetics, Ohio State University,
Columbus OH 43210, USA, §Department of Anthropology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Abstract
We estimated the rate of extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs) in waved albatrosses (Phoebastria
irrorata) on Isla Española, Galápagos, Ecuador, using multilocus minisatellite DNA finger-
printing. Waved albatrosses are socially monogamous, long-lived seabirds whose main
population is on Española. Aggressive extra-pair copulation (EPC) attempts have been
observed in the breeding colony during the days preceding egg-laying. Our genetic analyses
of 16 families (single chicks and their attending parents) revealed evidence of EPFs in
four families. In all cases males were the excluded parent. These data suggest that waved
albatrosses have an unusually high rate of EPF relative to taxa with similar life histories.
Future behavioural observations will determine the extent to which forced vs. unforced

  

Source: Anderson, David J. - Department of Biology, Wake Forest University
Jones, Thomas C. - Department of Biological Sciences, East Tennessee State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology