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Transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of atmospheric sulfur: Global implications for the sulfur budget
 

Summary: Transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of atmospheric sulfur:
Global implications for the sulfur budget
Becky Alexander,1
Rokjin J. Park,2
Daniel J. Jacob,3
and Sunling Gong4
Received 23 May 2008; revised 15 September 2008; accepted 4 November 2008; published 30 January 2009.
[1] We use observations of the oxygen-17 excess (D17
O) of sulfate in the Arctic to
quantify the sulfate source from aqueous SO2 (S(IV)) oxidation by O2 catalyzed by
transition metals. Due to the lack of photochemically produced OH and H2O2 in high
latitudes during winter, combined with high anthropogenic SO2 emissions in the Northern
Hemisphere, oxidation by O3 is predicted to dominate sulfate formation during winter
in this region. However, D17
O measurements of sulfate aerosol collected in Alert, Canada,
are not consistent with O3 as the dominant oxidant and indicate that a S(IV) oxidant with
near-zero D17
O values (O2) is important during winter. We use a global chemical
transport model to interpret quantitatively the Alert observations and assess the global
importance of sulfate production by Fe(III)- and Mn(II)-catalyzed oxidation of S(IV) by

  

Source: Alexander, Becky - Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington at Seattle

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences