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MODELLING HUMAN VARIATION IN ASSEMBLY LINE MODELS Mr. Peer-Olaf Siebers
 

Summary: MODELLING HUMAN VARIATION IN ASSEMBLY LINE MODELS
Mr. Peer-Olaf Siebers
Dr. Tim Baines
Mr. Stephen Mason
Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Science, University of Cranfield
Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, England
p.siebers@cranfield.ac.uk, t.s.baines@cranfield.ac.uk, s.mason@cranfield.ac.uk
Mr. John Ladbrook
Ford Motor Company
Dunton, England
jladbroo@ford.com
ABSTRACT:
Discrete event simulation models allow engineers to understand and predict the behaviour of manufacturing
systems. A standard way of taking workers into account is to model them as resources not considering any
person, organisational or environmental influences. Worker behaviour differs notably between people, tasks
and systems which has an impact on the individual processing times and in the end on the output of the
manufacturing system. Ignoring this fact causes inaccuracy in the results from the simulation model,
especially when modelling systems with highly manual work content, such as assembly lines. The paper
describes the ongoing research of investigating the importance of incorporating human performance
variation models into manufacturing system simulation models.

  

Source: Aickelin, Uwe - School of Computer Science, University of Nottingham

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences