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vol. 168, no. 5 the american naturalist november 2006 Host-Parasite Coevolution and Selection on Sex
 

Summary: vol. 168, no. 5 the american naturalist november 2006
Host-Parasite Coevolution and Selection on Sex
through the Effects of Segregation
Aneil F. Agrawal1,* and Sarah P. Otto2,
1. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of
Toronto, 25 Harbord Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G5, Canada;
2. Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, 6250
University Boulevard, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada
Submitted January 21, 2006; Accepted June 30, 2006;
Electronically published September 20, 2006
Online enhancement: appendix.
abstract: The advantage of producing novel variation to keep
apace of coevolving species has been invoked as a major explanation
for the evolution and maintenance of sex (the Red Queen hypoth-
esis). Recent theoretical investigations of the Red Queen hypothesis
have focused on the effects of recombination in haploid species,
finding that species interactions rarely favor the evolution of sex
unless selection is strong. Yet by focusing on haploids, these studies
have ignored a potential advantage of sex in diploids: generating
novel combinations of alleles at a particular locus through segre-

  

Source: Agrawal, Aneil F. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto
Otto, Sarah - Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology