Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00333.x
 

Summary: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00333.x
MATING DENSITY AND THE STRENGTH OF
SEXUAL SELECTION AGAINST DELETERIOUS
ALLELES IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER
Nathaniel P. Sharp1,2
and Aneil F. Agrawal1,3
1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Harbord Street,
Toronto, ON, Canada, MSS 3G5
2E-mail: nathaniel.sharp@utoronto.ca
3E-mail: afagrawal@eeb.utoronto.ca
Received November 21, 2007
Accepted January 4, 2008
Deleterious alleles constantly enter populations via mutation. Their presence reduces mean fitness and may threaten population
persistence. It has been suggested that sexual selection may be an efficient way by which deleterious alleles are removed from
populations but there is little direct experimental evidence. Because of its potential role in mutational meltdowns, there is par-
ticular interest in whether the strength of sexual selection changes with density. For each of eight visible markers in Drosophila
melanogaster we have compared the strength of sexual selection at two densities. We find evidence of strong sexual selection
against most but not all of these alleles. There is no evidence that sexual selection tends to be stronger (or weaker) at high density
relative to low density. In addition, we also measure the effects of these mutations on two key parameters relevant to population

  

Source: Agrawal, Aneil F. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology