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Ecology, 80(5), 1999, pp. 17131723 1999 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 1713
Ecology, 80(5), 1999, pp. 17131723
1999 by the Ecological Society of America
INDUCED RESPONSES TO HERBIVORY IN WILD RADISH: EFFECTS ON
SEVERAL HERBIVORES AND PLANT FITNESS
ANURAG A. AGRAWAL1
Department of Entomology and Center for Population Biology, One Shields Avenue,
University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616-8584 USA
Abstract. Induced responses to herbivory are changes in plant quality following initial
damage by herbivores. These changes can negatively affect subsequent herbivores. I studied
induced responses in annual wild radish plants, Raphanus raphanistrum and R. sativus
(Brassicaceae), which included increased density and total number of setose trichomes on
newly formed leaves of previously damaged plants compared to undamaged controls. I also
characterized the effects of induced responses on the preference and performance of several
herbivores and the net consequences for plant performance in the field.
Wild radish plants damaged by caterpillars or sprayed with a natural plant response
elicitor, jasmonic acid, supported reduced growth of generalist noctuid larvae compared to
unmanipulated control plants. Induced responses did not affect the growth of specialist
Pieris rapae larvae. In choice and no-choice experiments, induction reduced the feeding
by noctuid larvae but did not reduce gross growth efficiency, an indicator of insect growth

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology