Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 535:501511, 2000 May 20 2000. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(
 

Summary: THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 535:501»511, 2000 May 20
2000. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(
MID-INFRARED OBSERVING CONDITIONS AT THE SOUTH POLE
M. A. CHAMBERLAIN, M. C. B. ASHLEY, M. G. BURTON, A. PHILLIPS, AND J. W. V. STOREY
Joint Australian Centre for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (JACARA), School of Physics,
University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia; m.burton=unsw.edu.au
AND
D. A. HARPER
University of Chicago, Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wisconsin 53191
Received 1999 September 22; accepted 1999 December 20
ABSTRACT
Measurements of the mid-infrared sky brightness at the South Pole throughout the winter of 1998
show that the sky background is extremely low and stable. For 50% of the time, the —ux in the 8.78 to
9.09 km window is below 50 Jy per square arcsecond. Typical background levels in this window during
clear conditions are of the order of 20 Jy per square arcsecond. This is almost an order of magnitude
better than any other site on earth. The lower limit to the sky background across most of the N window
appears to be set by the aerosol content of the sky rather than by residual water vapor. These data were
acquired remotely using an automated instrument housed in the AASTO (Automated Astrophysical Site-
Testing Observatory).
Subject headings: atmospheric eects » infrared: general » site testing

  

Source: Ashley, Michael C. B. - School of Physics, University of New South Wales

 

Collections: Physics