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Erratum: In the article printed below, which appeared in J. Immunol. 160:1304, please note the following correction. Due to a printer's error, the word conalbumin was replaced with Con A. The corrected paper is printed in its
 

Summary: Erratum: In the article printed below, which appeared in J. Immunol. 160:1304, please note the following correction.
Due to a printer's error, the word conalbumin was replaced with Con A. The corrected paper is printed in its
entirety.
Requirement for In Vivo Production of IL-4, But Not IL-10, in
the Induction of Proliferative Suppression by Filarial
Parasites1
Andrew S. MacDonald,* Rick M. Maizels,* Rachel A. Lawrence,
Ian Dransfield,
and
Judith E. Allen2
*
Loss of T lymphocyte proliferation and the emergence of a host response that is dominated by a Th2-type profile are well-
established features of human filariasis. We have previously reported that adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from mice
transplanted with adult Brugia malayi parasites suppress the proliferation of lymphocytes without blocking Ag-cytokine produc-
tion in vitro. We now show that infection of mice with the infective larval (L3) stage of B. malayi generates a similar population
of PEC. Suppressive cells are generated within 7 days of infection and mediate their effects through a nitric oxide-independent
pathway. Both L3 and adult infection elicit high levels of host IL-4 whereas the microfilarial stage of the parasite induces IFN-
production and does not generate a similar form of suppression. Production of host IL-4 was necessary to allow the generation of
suppressive PEC, given that IL-4-deficient mice implanted with adult parasites failed to induce proliferative block. However,
IL-10-deficient mice implanted with adult parasites resulted in T cell suppression, indicating that IL-10 is not essential for the

  

Source: Allen, Judith - School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine