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JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Mar. 1996, p. 14511456 Vol. 178, No. 5 0021-9193/96/$04.00 0
 

Summary: JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Mar. 1996, p. 14511456 Vol. 178, No. 5
0021-9193/96/$04.00 0
Copyright 1996, American Society for Microbiology
Phylogenetic Analysis of Metabacterium polyspora: Clues to the
Evolutionary Origin of Daughter Cell Production in
Epulopiscium Species, the Largest Bacteria
ESTHER R. ANGERT,1
AUSTIN E. BROOKS,2
AND NORMAN R. PACE1
*
Department of Biology and Institute for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington,
Indiana 47405,1
and Biology Department, Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana 479332
Received 27 June 1995/Accepted 15 November 1995
It is rare that there are molecular clues to the evolutionary origin of developmental traits. We have
encountered an evolutionary juxtaposition that may explain the origin of the unique replicative morphology of
Epulopiscium spp., the largest known bacteria, which reproduce by the internal production of multiple live
offspring. We report here a 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic analysis of Metabacterium polyspora, a multiple-
endospore-forming, uncultivated inhabitant of guinea pig cecum. Cells of M. polyspora were harvested from
cecum contents by sedimentation in a Ficoll gradient and lysed. The bacterial 16S rRNA genes of this lysate

  

Source: Angert, Esther - Department of Microbiology, Cornell University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine