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1988 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 92, 1988-1996 here; the transfer process can involve either partitioning or ad-
 

Summary: 1988 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 92, 1988-1996
here; the transfer process can involve either partitioning or ad-
sorption, the "solvent" being a surface in the latter case.) The
principal solvation process in chromatographic separation is the
creation of an acceptor cavity in (or on) the stationary`phase and
the destruction of the donor cavity in the mobile phase.
Thus binding processesand chromatographic retention processes
are quite different: the former requires only the change of cavity
size in a single solvent; the latter requires creation of a cavity in
one solvent and the destruction of a cavity in another solvent. The
solvophobic theory is based on the premise that the only cavity
which is relevant to retention is that in the mobile-phase solvent;
it neglects the acceptor cavity in the stationary phase. Conse-
quently, it predicts that retention should depend only on the surface
tension of the mobile-phase solvent and not on the surface tension
or other physical properties of the grafted stationary phase. In
a partitioning theory such as the present one, cavitiesare described
through the binary interaction constants, x;their differences
account for the driving force for retention. The solvophobictheory
therefore errs in important respects. For example: (i) it does not

  

Source: Agmon, Noam - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Collections: Chemistry