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WOMEN ENGINEERS IN TERTIARY EDUCATION IN AUSTRALIA: THE STRUCTURAL AND CULTURAL BARRIERS THEY FACE
 

Summary: WOMEN ENGINEERS IN TERTIARY EDUCATION IN AUSTRALIA: THE STRUCTURAL AND
CULTURAL BARRIERS THEY FACE
Jean Armstrong
Department of Electronic Engineering
La Trobe University
Bundoora, Victoria 3083
Women form only a small minority of undergraduates, postgraduates and academics in
Australian engineering faculties. In 1993 women represented 14 percent of those commencing
bachelor degrees in engineering at universities, 15 per cent of those commencing research
masters degrees and 13 percent of those commencing doctorates.
In 1994 less than 6 percent of engineering academics were women. These women were
heavily concentrated in the 'below lecturer' grades and in limited tenure positions. In 1994
they held 16 percent of the below lecturer positions but less than 4 percent of the
tenured/tenurable positions. These differences are only partially explained by differences in
age distribution.
In this paper the structural and cultural difficulties which face female engineers within tertiary
education in Australia are analysed. The impact that the lack of women in engineering
faculties may have on factors such as student workload, and course content and delivery are
discussed.
1. INTRODUCTION

  

Source: Armstrong, Jean - Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University

 

Collections: Engineering