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DOI: 10.1021/la100294p 4607Langmuir 2010, 26(7), 46074612 Published on Web 03/03/2010 pubs.acs.org/Langmuir
 

Summary: DOI: 10.1021/la100294p 4607Langmuir 2010, 26(7), 46074612 Published on Web 03/03/2010
pubs.acs.org/Langmuir
2010 American Chemical Society
Conductive, Physiologically Responsive Hydrogels
Jin-Oh You and Debra T. Auguste*
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
Received January 20, 2010. Revised Manuscript Received February 16, 2010
Coupling molecular sensing with electrical conductivity may provide an important and valuable resource in assessing
disease pathology. Here, we introduce pH-responsive hydrogels with homogeneously synthesized gold (Au) nanoparti-
cles that reversibly alter conductivity through pH-induced volumetric swelling. These intelligent hybrid materials
respond to physiological pH shifts (pH 7.4 to 5.5) that can (1) alter the conductivity of the gel or (2) create conductive
conduits via micropatterned arrays.
Electrical conductivity may be used to sense physiological
changes related to disease pathology. Several diseases are asso-
ciated with acidosis of the blood, such as diabetic ketoacidosis,1
tumors,2
respiratory distress,3
and ischemia.4
The lack of sensi-
tivity to small changes in pH has limited the use of hydrogels

  

Source: Auguste, Debra T. - School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

 

Collections: Materials Science; Biology and Medicine