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INFANT BEHAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT 20 (1), 1997, pp. 3-28 ISSN01634383 Copyright 0 1997 ABLEX Publishing Corporation All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.
 

Summary: INFANT BEHAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT 20 (1), 1997, pp. 3-28 ISSN01634383
Copyright 0 1997 ABLEX Publishing Corporation All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.
ISIS 1996 Dissertation Award
Selective Integration of Temporally Distinct Perceptual
Information in Infant Memory
SCOTT A. ADLER
Rutgers University
Perceptual and memory studies with adult\ have converged on the idea that temporally disjunct
information can be integrated into a single, unified representation. Those studies. however, used
very brief delays between the successive presentations and. therefore, did not examine whether
distinct information can be integrated over the long term. These experiments with 3.month-olds
explored whether perceptual information that is presented successively over long intervals can be
integrated into a single, unified memory representation. Infants learned to kick to move a mobile
that displayed either Ss or vertical lines, and were passively exposed 24 hours later to a mobile that
displayed the other stimulus character. Twenty-four hours later. infants recognized a novel dollar
sign (a blend of the training and exposure cues), suggesting that the training and exposure infor-
mation were perceptually integrated as a single-blend representation in long-term memory. Inter-
estingly, infants discriminated the same training and exposure cues when they were in a spatially
independent arrangement (Ss and vertical lines side-by-side). I conclude. therefore. that perceptual
information successively encountered over a relatively long temporal interval was not stored in

  

Source: Adler, Scott A. - Centre for Vision Research & Department of Psychology, York University (Toronto)

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine