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RBMOnline -Vol 14. No 6. 2007 758-764 Reproductive BioMedicine Online; www.rbmonline.com/Article/2772 on web 26 April 2007-Vol 14. No 6. 2007 758-764 Reproductive BioMedicine Online; www.rbmonline.com/Article/2772 on web 26 April 2007-Vol 14. No 6. 2007 7
 

Summary: RBMOnline - Vol 14. No 6. 2007 758-764 Reproductive BioMedicine Online; www.rbmonline.com/Article/2772 on web 26 April 2007- Vol 14. No 6. 2007 758-764 Reproductive BioMedicine Online; www.rbmonline.com/Article/2772 on web 26 April 2007- Vol 14. No 6. 2007 758-764 Reproductive BioMedicine Online; www.rbmonline.com/Article/
758
2007 Published by Reproductive Healthcare Ltd, Duck End Farm, Dry Drayton, Cambridge CB3 8DB, UK
Karla J Hutt conducted her graduate studies, which focused on receptor-ligand interactions
and female gamete biology, at the Australian National University in Canberra. She was
awarded her PhD degree in 2006 and is now at the University of Kansas Medical Center where
she is a post-doctoral fellow under the supervision of David F Albertini. Dr Hutt's research
interests include using confocal imaging techniques to understand the characteristics of
meiotic spindle assembly, dynamics and integrity of in-vitro matured and cryopreserved
oocytes.
Karla J Hutt, David F Albertini1
The Center for Reproductive Sciences, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Centre,
3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
1
Correspondence: Tel: +11 913 588 0412; Fax: +11 913 588 0456; e-mail: dalbertini@kumc.edu
Abstract
The mammalian oocyte undertakes a highly complex journey to maturity during which it successively acquires a series of
characteristics necessary for fertilization and the development of a healthy embryo. While the contribution of granulosa cells
to oocyte development has been studied for many years, it has recently become apparent that the oocyte itself plays a key role
in directing its own fate as well as the growth and differentiation of the follicle. This regulatory capacity is achieved through

  

Source: Albertini, David - Center for Reproductive Sciences, University of Kansas

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine