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This pdf file is licensed for distribution in the form of electronic reprints and by way of personal or institutional websites authorized by the author(s).
 

Summary: This pdf file is licensed for distribution in the form of electronic reprints and by way of personal or
institutional websites authorized by the author(s).
A copyright license has been purchased to make this possible.
Seasonality, the latitudinal gradient of diversity, and
Eocene insects
S. Bruce Archibald, William H. Bossert, David R. Greenwood, and
Brian D. Farrell
Seasonality, the latitudinal gradient of diversity, and
Eocene insects
S. Bruce Archibald, William H. Bossert, David R. Greenwood, and
Brian D. Farrell
Abstract.--In the modern world, biotic diversity is typically higher in low-latitude tropical regions
where there is abundant insolation (light and heat) and low thermal seasonality. Because these factors
broadly covary with latitude, separating their possible effects on species diversity is difficult. The
Eocene was a much more equable world, however, with low temperature seasonality extending into
lower-insolation higher, cooler latitudes, allowing us to test these factors by comparing insect species
diversity in (1) modern, temperate, low-insolation, highly seasonal Harvard Forest, Massachusetts,
U.S.A., 42u299N; (2) modern, tropical, high-insolation, low-seasonality La Selva, Costa Rica, 10u269N,
and; (3) Eocene, temperate, low-insolation, yet low-seasonality McAbee, British Columbia, Canada,
above 50uN paleolatitude. We found insect diversity at McAbee to be more similar to La Selva than to

  

Source: Archibald, S. Bruce - Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University
Farrell, Brian D. - Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology